Pollanation

Bates College has posted an edited transcript of a talk by Michael Pollan that a few of us schlepped up to Lewiston to see a few weeks ago. It was worth the trip. After many were turned out due to limited capacity, he offered to repeat the talk again the following morning. We were lucky enough to be putting the standing in standing room only (those sitting on the floor had to leave) we wouln’t have made it back up there on a Tuesday morning.

Part of what was edited out of the posted transcript appears to be the questions and answers at the end. This is unfortunate, because they were some of the best parts of the talk. Mr. Pollan fielded questions regarding local food consumption and production, how the country handles food aid to other countries, and victory gardens on the white house lawn, among others. A number of these questions centered around a recent article of his in the New York Times.

They videotaped the event so I was hoping they would put it online. As yet I haven’t seen it show up, or at least haven’t found it anywhere. I guess if they are only posting edited transcripts, there’s not much hope to see the full session in video. Oh well.

I should mention that I discovered this event via one of my new-found favorite local blogs. Portland Psst! serves up “Food gossip. Reviews. And overheards.”, and offers a solid linkroll to boot. It’s not the easiest to pronounce when telling your friends about it (Portland what?), but Portland Psst! is a highly reccomended addition to your newsreader. What’s more, they just celebrated their 1,111th posting (on 11/1, no less!), so hop on over and give ‘em a slap on the back and a hearty hullo.

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About this article

Green Galoshes is a weblog written by Justin D. Henry. This entry was published on or around November 13, 2008.

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